Weekly Feature



2018-08-09 / Editorial

Spindle items

CHRIS GRAHAM
Orchard Park Editor

TURKEY TROT — Registration for the 123rd annual YMCA Turkey Trot has opened, according to YMCA Buffalo Niagara. Runners may register at www.YMCABN.org until race capacity is reached.

Presented by ADPRO Sports, the Turkey Trot is a Thanksgiving Day tradition, which, according to the YMCA, sells out every year, so race organizers recommend that interested participants register early.

The oldest consecutively run footrace in North America, the Turkey Trot is an 8K race that attracts 14,000 runners and walkers annually.

According to the YMCA, proceeds raised from the event benefit children and families who would otherwise be unable to afford YMCA programs and services.

In 2017, Turkey Trot participants helped YMCA Buffalo Niagara provide more than $1.2 million in financial assistance to families in need throughout Western New York.

For more information on this year’s race, visit YMCABN.org or contact the Turkey Trot call line at 565-6000.

GIRL SCOUTS — The Girl Scout Difference Campaign unleashes the power of the G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader) and shows why Girl Scouts is a pre-eminent leadership development experience for girls in the world. The awareness and recruitment campaign is running through Nov. 30.

The Girl Scout Difference Campaign raises the voices of local Girl Scouts and female professionals about the difference Girl Scouts makes in the lives of women.

During the campaign, current members and alumnae will share how Girl Scouts has made a difference in their life or the life of someone they care about with quotes and photos on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter using the hashtag #GirlScoutDifference.

According to the organization, Girl Scouts takes the potential of girls, combines it with skill-building programming, and adds caring adult mentors and strong female role models.

The Girl Scout program reportedly helps girls thrive in five key ways: develop a strong sense of self; seek challenges and learn from setbacks; display positive values; form and maintain healthy relationships; and identify and solve problems in the community.

PLANNING AN EVENT?— The Bee likes to keep its readers abreast of all the happenings in town. If you’re hosting a fundraiser or community event, small or large, send us the information and we’ll publish it in our What’s Going On section. We may even choose to cover your event as a feature story. The best way to submit information is to visit www.beenews.com, click on “News Dept.” then “Announce an Event,” and complete the form. You may also email me at cgraham@beenews.com, or call 204-4902.

BEE HEARD— One of the most talked-about and exciting features in this newspaper for many years has been Bee Heard. It gives readers a chance to say what’s on their mind in an anonymous manner. It’s important to note that though the negative calls sometimes get the most attention, it’s also a great place to give a positive perspective on things. To reach the Bee Heard line, call 632-0390.

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